Total's 25 year presence in Myanmar

A. Breuillac and N. Shah about what we learned from the challenges we faced, how we resisted the pressure to leave, our belief that we were doing the right thing, and what the future holds in Myanmar.
Read the transcript: 
We learned a lot in Myanmar.
 
We took lots of flak from outside Total
for our decision
 
to stay in Myanmar
despite its government.
 
I never got the sense
 
that local people,
 
staff that had been there from day one,
 
had ever doubted
 
that we had really contributed
and had really done something
 
that they were clearly
very, very proud of.
 
You don't choose countries
that have oil or gas.
 
What's important is being able
to operate in countries
 
while still adhering
to our code of ethics
 
and our production
and business practices.
 
We thought we needed to stay
despite everyone's opposition,
 
because we were convinced that
the communities near our facilities
 
benefitted from us being there,
 
and that Total's withdrawal
would be a setback
 
and not a step forward for them.
 
Total E&P Myanmar
is an affiliate
 
that brought us a lot of challenges
 
and showed us that if we did
the right thing on the ground,
 
we were able
to deal with those challenges.
 
We really had to think about
the communities and countries
 
that we live in and work in.
 
We also had very little access to NGOs.
 
So we had to do it in-house.
 
And having to do it in-house
taught us a lot.
 
First of all,
that we were able to do it
 
and figure out what was right
for the communities.
 
The idea wasn't how much money
was being spent,
 
but what impact we have
now and long-term.
 
So in that sense,
it forced us to work differently
 
and the whole Group learned from that.
 
Aung San Suu Kyi actually decided
 
to find out more
about what we were doing
 
and she visited our installations.
 
Then she visited
the people on the ground
 
to get first-hand feedback
about what was going on there.
 
It was only after she did all that
 
that she endorsed Total
as a responsible investor.
 
When Patrick Pouyanné and I met
Aung San Suu Kyi in late April,
 
she was totally up to speed
with Total's activities in the country.
 
Not just the history,
but what's going on now.
 
Notably the startup of Badamyar.
 
It was clear to her that Total
was a reliable partner
 
which had shown
it was committed to the country.
 
But she's counting on us
to keep supporting the development
 
of the country in the future.
 
We're proud of the Badamyar project.
 
It was delivered on time.
 
Plus, it came in under the budget.
 
I salute and thank the teams.
 
The story is far from over.
 
I hope we have a great future ahead.
 
We're very proud
of what we've achieved here.

 

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